ryanpanos:

Google Maps Glitches | Emilio Vavarella | Via

As sophisticated as it is, Google Maps is fundamentally the same type of thing cartographers have been making for centuries. It’s a flat, scaled representation of our planet. That means decisions have been made about what to show and what to leave out. At any given level of zoom, you can see only a certain subset of streets, of cities, of tributaries or topography. Even today, some streets are missing or mislaid. It feels omniscient, but its omniscience is made by humans, for humans.

Google Street View is something entirely different: a photographic document of world. It’s more objective and indelible than even the most accurate satellite-aided map. And that’s a bit unsettling. When every acre on Earth is catalogued for us to see, where will all the mysteries hide?

Thankfully, Google’s nine-eyed robot cameras and their attendant code aren’t quite omniscient either. And as Emilio Vavarella shows us in his screenshots, the places where that system breaks down have a mystery all their own.

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wearenomadique:

NMDQ Community Spotlight //
Portrait of a Pilgrim by Michael George

Photographer Michael George exhibited the beginnings of his Portrait of a Pilgrim project at our first ever Nomadique Collections show in December 2012, as well as in our two month exhibition at THINK Coffee in early 2013. Since then, he has walked the Camino de Santiago a second time and has built an incredible multimedia project which poetically takes us through this ancient pilgrimage route. We’ve been lucky to partake in Michael’s process over the past year as he developed his project through the Nomadique Artist Workshop Dinner series, partnering with fellow Workshop artist Zubin Hensler for the creation of a musical score to accompanying his images. Aside from being an inspiring and astoundingly talented artist, Michael is an invaluable member of the NMDQ community, who consistently provides thoughtful feedback and support to the artists who share their work with us each month.

We asked Michael to share his thoughts about the Workshop Dinner series and how it was helpful in the shaping of his project:

The workshop dinners have been a constant source of inspiration. Without them I wouldn’t have had the chance to collaborate with Zubin for my final project. Working with another artist with such a firm grasp on his creative vision really helped me in putting together the final production. I have been to the workshop dinners to receive feedback on image edits, presentation formats, and my personal writing. All critiques have not just put pressure to complete my personal projects but also provided valuable feedback from a wide-range of artists. Whenever I talk about my life in Brooklyn I mention what an incredible little creative community we have found. - Michael George

Check out the Portrait of a Pilgrim series and follow Michael on instagram.

matthewb:

Antibody (working with Elastic in L.A. and Breeder in Brisbane) created the main title sequence for the HBO drama series True Detective, my favourite since True Blood first aired. Art of the Title has an interview with creative director Patrick Clair about the project:

Visually, we were inspired by photographic double exposures. Fragmented portraits, created by using human figures as windows into partial landscapes, served as a great way to show characters that are marginalised or internally divided.

Sidenote: I’m thrilled to have animator Alex Frukta helping with selections for Nice Type, the Vimeo channel I created to showcase great typographic work on that platform. This title sequence was his most recent pick.

benrobertsphoto:

This is a photo of me by @srdaine from 2009. Listen up and take notes kids: in the words of @franchitastic - this is what happens when you drink too much beer, eat too many potatoes and don’t do enough exercise. Oh - and forget to get your hair cut.

benrobertsphoto:

This is a photo of me by @srdaine from 2009. Listen up and take notes kids: in the words of @franchitastic - this is what happens when you drink too much beer, eat too many potatoes and don’t do enough exercise. Oh - and forget to get your hair cut.

photojojo:

Apple has managed to dominate mobile photography for the past few years, and with their latest patent filing, they’re poised to go even further.
According to the filing, Apple is working on a smartphone camera that would fully support interchangeable lenses, one of the biggest reasons many photographers still prefer a traditional setup.
The Next iPhone Camera Could Support Interchangeable Lenses
via Reddit 

photojojo:

Apple has managed to dominate mobile photography for the past few years, and with their latest patent filing, they’re poised to go even further.

According to the filing, Apple is working on a smartphone camera that would fully support interchangeable lenses, one of the biggest reasons many photographers still prefer a traditional setup.

The Next iPhone Camera Could Support Interchangeable Lenses

via Reddit 

warrenellis:

You were not born with the ability to fly, cure disease or communicate at long distances, but you were born in a society that endows you with these capacities. These capacities are the result of information that has been generated by humans and that humans have been able to embed in tangible and digital objects. This information is all around you. It is the way in which the atoms in an airplane are arranged or the way in which your cell-phone whispers dance instructions to electromagnetic waves. Pantheon is a project celebrating the cultural information that endows our species with these fantastic capacities. To celebrate our global cultural heritage we are compiling, analyzing and visualizing datasets that can help us understand the process of global cultural development. Dive in, visualize, and enjoy at pantheon.media.mit.edu. Pantheon: The Ghosts of Information Macro Connections

untitled on Flickr.Ana. Sevilla, 2009.

untitled on Flickr.

Ana. Sevilla, 2009.